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Four Strong Winds   Leave a comment

We each took our own photos, and Harper made the composite. You’ll find the full-size version (1920 wallpaper) on Harper’s Flickr stream.

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If there’s a song that is considered “quintessentially Canadian,” it’s Ian Tyson’s “Four Strong Winds.” Around 55 years have passed since Ian wrote it, and performed it with his then-wife Sylvia Tyson (née Fricker). “Four Strong Winds” became not only a standard in the Canadian repertoire, but also well known in the United States after performers such as Judy Collins and Johnny Cash performed it.

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Suffer the Children


Can you help me remember how to smile
Make it somehow all seem worthwhile ….

Just one possible result of a runaway’s world

Yesterday, while listening to Sirius XM on my computer, I stumbled across an old 1993 ballad — Soul Asylum’s “Runaway Train.” It had been years since I’d listened to it, and I’d forgotten how powerful and painful this song was; even more so when I pulled up on YouTube one of the several versions of the video. (You can see below for the embedded video, or follow the link.) The closing of an Amber Alert here in Canada today, with the sad death of the missing girl and the arrest of her father, just spurs me more to write this.

Runaways and missing children have always been with us, but they really came to the front of people’s knowledge with cases like Etan Patz and Adam Walsh. (See Harper’s article from 2012. In researching today’s article, I’ve learned that Etan was declared legally dead in 2001, and that a man who confessed was convicted of second-degree murder in 2017.) Those boys are just two of thousands of boys and girls who disappear every year, either by running off for some reason, or being kidnapped. It’s not confined to one country, either — Canada has its own burden of missing, as does probably every region on Earth.

If, somehow, you know information that can lead to finding one of the missing, any age, any condition, please give the authorities that info. You can contact your local police or constabulary. Additionally, you can contact the Missing Children Society of Canada, or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in the United States.

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Posted February 15, 2019 by Conan Bankersbox in Real Life

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Ippos Winter

No SLurl for this; Ippos has a lot of private residences.

Posted December 7, 2018 by Conan Bankersbox in Arts, Photographs

Skating Party

Photographed in Hollyee (Starlight Shores region)

First Snows

Photographed in Footprints in the Snow 2 region.  This is mainly a seasonal residential sim (with small houses for rent), but it has some nice public areas for attempts at photography.

Full-size wallpaper at my Flickr stream

Night Mail

This is the night mail crossing the Border,
Bringing the cheque and the postal order,
Letters for the rich, letters for the poor,
The shop at the corner, the girl next door.
Pulling up Beattock, a steady climb:
The gradient’s against her, but she’s on time.

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Bluenose

I wasn’t sure I’d find anything like the boat behind me — a replica of a hundred-foot fishing schooner, similar to a very famous one from Canada — but I lucked out in the end.  While I was wikiwalking today, you see, I was reminded of what some claim is the most famous ship in Canadian history, one most of us take for granted every day because it’s in our pockets, and we see it so damned often that we “forget” about it.  But never, never completely ….

The 1920s were the last great days of the wind-driven North Atlantic fishing fleets, including out of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.  In 1921, the schooner Bluenose was launched, in part to participate in the dory-fishing trade on the Grand Banks, but also to get revenge on the Americans for winning a schooner race sponsored by a newspaper.  She could work hard — she carried eight dories, which would be launched up to four times a day when she was active during the fishing season — but she was designed as much for speed, with a very unique profile in the water.

The Bluenose handily won the right to represent Canada in the 1921 International Fisherman’s Trophy, and proceeded to take apart the American Elsie in October to win the Cup.  She and her captain, Angus Walters, defended the Cup in 1922 against the Henry S. Ford.  The 1923 race ended in controversy, and another wasn’t held for years.

The ship continued mostly successful in racing, and represented Nova Scotia in 1935 for the Silver Jubilee of His Majesty King George V; but her paying days as a fishing boat were ending.  Motor trawlers started taking over the trade from the dorymen in the 1930s; that and the Great Depression hit the wind-driven fishers hard.  The Bluenose‘s greatest racing challenger was at hand, though — Gloucester’s Gertrude L. Thebaud.  The Thebaud defeated her in a challenge cup in 1930; but the Bluenose had the better of the American boat in the International Fisherman’s Trophy, defeating her twice — and ending with the trophy in her possession in 1938.  That was the end for her, though; her masts were removed afterward by new owners, who moved her to the Caribbean in 1942 and turned this beauty into a diesel-powered coastal freighter.  She ran aground off Haiti in 1946, was abandoned, and broke up on the reef.

The Bluenose has never been forgotten by Canada, though.  At the height of her fame, the schooner was placed on the reverse of Canada’s dime coin, where she has sailed ever since.  Even before that, she was commemorated on one of Canada’s most famous stamps; and again in 1988, on a stamp honouring Angus Walters, her long-time captain.  And a replica, Bluenose II, built from her original plans, sails the waters out of Lunenburg to this day as a living museum and “ambassador” of Nova Scotia.

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