Archive for the ‘Real Life’ Category

REBLOG — This World Needs More Neighbors Like Mr Rogers   Leave a comment

John Pavlovitz

As I promised back in 2017, this blog wasn’t going to stay aloof from sensitive things in Real Life.  We do, however, pick and choose what we fasten on to for speaking on or republishing, which is why the political world hasn’t intruded as much as we might have.

However, this piece, written by John Pavlovitz, needs to be read, please.  If we remembered the core message of all Fred Rogers did, ignoring the surface hagiography that has accumulated since his death, and put those teachings into effect, we might not be in the state we’re in currently.

Please click through and read this.  They who have ears to hear, let them hear ….

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I got to visit with an old neighborhood friend today. When I was a child, Fred Rogers always made me feel that his home was my home, and I gladly spent countless afternoons there learning and listening and dreaming. Sitting in a packed screening of Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, a much older, much more cynical… Continue Reading This World Needs More Neighbors Like Mr Rogers

Source: This World Needs More Neighbors Like Mr Rogers

Posted November 23, 2019 by Harper Ganesvoort in Real Life, Reblog

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Veterans Day 2019: The 442nd   Leave a comment

We of Around the Grid always try to remember the men and women who have served in the military on Veterans (or Remembrance) Day. This year, I want to touch briefly on one group of veterans from World War II. It’ll be brief, only a few paragraphs, because I’m far from a professional historian, and all that the unit did in the European Theater would compose a book of its own.

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Writing About Thad   1 comment

This isn’t a pleasant piece, but I want to write about it here, to get some of the sadness out of my system. I’ve just received news about a man I’ve respected since the mid-Eighties, when I entered college.

Thad was president of the school when I entered, but he’d had a long and distinguished career before then at other schools, beginning as a professor of English at a northeastern university. I recall this large man, addressing us all at the front of the room during our orientation meeting, wonderfully personable and knowledgeable. I ran into Thad a few times after that during the remaining years of his presidency, always a friendly face and caring for his students.

This morning, the word worked its way to me that Thad is in a hospice, going through his last illness. He hasn’t died yet, but it’s only a matter of time, probably no more than a month or so. I’m praying for him, for a gentle death, and I’m praying for his family.

Posted October 26, 2019 by Harper Ganesvoort in Personal, Real Life

Vote … Canada   Leave a comment

An Elections Canada ballot box is shown on federal election day in Montreal, Monday, May 2, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

The ladies have ceded the blog to me for today, because their goals are much the same as mine when it comes to politics. Specifically, we want you to vote.

This time, though, I’m talking, and so I’m talking to Canadians. Today is our scheduled general election day, after 40 bruising days of campaigning by the six parties, and it’s now up to us to choose. That’s what I’m asking you to do. Polls are already closed in the Atlantic provinces and parts of my province of Québec, and more will be closing in some 20 minutes. It’s your job, if your poll is still open, to get in there and make your X on your ballot.

Why? Because, believe it or not, the votes matter. This is where we finally get a real say in how we want our country to work, how we can hold these men and women accountable for the actions they’ve taken. Your vote matters, especially in an election as close as this one is. So get out there!

Posted October 21, 2019 by Conan Bankersbox in Real Life

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“This … is Lore”   Leave a comment

Writing from Nashville, Tennessee —

I’m giving myself a sort of real-life rezz-day present today … more like tonight, actually. I’ve traveled to Nashville with my daughter for a show.

(sounds of plunking banjos in the background, followed by a scratching record)

No, not that show, ya nimrods! (Although we should take a look at the Grand Ole Opry one day, I suppose ….) This will be a live “concert” performance of a show that took the podcast world by storm a few years ago, and has since spawned two related programs, a streaming-television series, and three books. All of this created by one man.

He’s Aaron Mahnke … and this is Lore.

Learn more lore on Lore; turn the page

He is Risen!

And the angel answered … Fear not ye: for I know that ye seek Jesus, which was crucified. He is not here: for he is risen, as he said. — Matthew 28:5-6

Teleport to The Anglican Cathedral in Second Life

Suffer the Children


Can you help me remember how to smile
Make it somehow all seem worthwhile ….

Just one possible result of a runaway’s world

Yesterday, while listening to Sirius XM on my computer, I stumbled across an old 1993 ballad — Soul Asylum’s “Runaway Train.” It had been years since I’d listened to it, and I’d forgotten how powerful and painful this song was; even more so when I pulled up on YouTube one of the several versions of the video. (You can see below for the embedded video, or follow the link.) The closing of an Amber Alert here in Canada today, with the sad death of the missing girl and the arrest of her father, just spurs me more to write this.

Runaways and missing children have always been with us, but they really came to the front of people’s knowledge with cases like Etan Patz and Adam Walsh. (See Harper’s article from 2012. In researching today’s article, I’ve learned that Etan was declared legally dead in 2001, and that a man who confessed was convicted of second-degree murder in 2017.) Those boys are just two of thousands of boys and girls who disappear every year, either by running off for some reason, or being kidnapped. It’s not confined to one country, either — Canada has its own burden of missing, as does probably every region on Earth.

If, somehow, you know information that can lead to finding one of the missing, any age, any condition, please give the authorities that info. You can contact your local police or constabulary. Additionally, you can contact the Missing Children Society of Canada, or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in the United States.

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Posted February 15, 2019 by Conan Bankersbox in Real Life

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