Archive for the ‘Real Life’ Category

Suffer the Children   3 comments


Can you help me remember how to smile
Make it somehow all seem worthwhile ….

Just one possible result of a runaway’s world

Yesterday, while listening to Sirius XM on my computer, I stumbled across an old 1993 ballad — Soul Asylum’s “Runaway Train.” It had been years since I’d listened to it, and I’d forgotten how powerful and painful this song was; even more so when I pulled up on YouTube one of the several versions of the video. (You can see below for the embedded video, or follow the link.) The closing of an Amber Alert here in Canada today, with the sad death of the missing girl and the arrest of her father, just spurs me more to write this.

Runaways and missing children have always been with us, but they really came to the front of people’s knowledge with cases like Etan Patz and Adam Walsh. (See Harper’s article from 2012. In researching today’s article, I’ve learned that Etan was declared legally dead in 2001, and that a man who confessed was convicted of second-degree murder in 2017.) Those boys are just two of thousands of boys and girls who disappear every year, either by running off for some reason, or being kidnapped. It’s not confined to one country, either — Canada has its own burden of missing, as does probably every region on Earth.

If, somehow, you know information that can lead to finding one of the missing, any age, any condition, please give the authorities that info. You can contact your local police or constabulary. Additionally, you can contact the Missing Children Society of Canada, or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in the United States.

=====

Posted February 15, 2019 by Conan Bankersbox in Real Life

Tagged with , ,

Christmas Card 2018, Harper   Leave a comment

Lift up your heads, O ye gates … and the King of glory shall come in.
Psalm 24:7

I wish you and yours a most blessed Christmas!

Posted December 25, 2018 by Harper Ganesvoort in Holidays and celebrations, Real Life

Tagged with ,

Christmas Card from Jem, 2018   Leave a comment

Posted December 25, 2018 by Jem Sternhall in Holidays and celebrations, Real Life

Tagged with

Christmas Eve 2018   1 comment

As always on this night, we of Around the Grid bring you our joint wishes for the future, as voiced by Bing Crosby and David Bowie —

From Conan, Jem, Diana, Morgan and myself, may the day of peace eternal come to this troubled world for us, for you … for us all. And remember that all of us — every son and daughter of the Divine, however you see the Divine — are the parents and nurturers of that peace. It is up to us to bring it, somehow.

Earthrise   Leave a comment

Far too hectic a week for Advent time, in my opinion — but, then again, I’ve never particularly celebrated Advent as the Episcopal Church encourages us to do. In any case, none of us has had much time, in the preparations for next week, to do much Second Life work — it is Second Life, after all, not the First (and more important) life. But I did take a few minutes to scan through Facebook and various other things, and I was reminded of this event from my childhood.

How many of you know this photograph? Some have called it one of the most important photos ever taken, and I recall it from stamps issued in 1969, in the months before Apollo 11 launched. It is rather prosaically identified in the NASA image catalogue as AS08-14-2382; however, it was popularly given the easier name of Earthrise. It was shot on December 24, 1968 by the crew of Apollo 8, the first manned spacecraft to fly clear of Terran gravity and orbit another celestial body. One author, Robert Poole, credits this photo with giving rise to the environmental movement 1, though I would suggest it more emphasized the fact that we only know of life on this one spot in the universe.

The photo was not revealed until the film was developed back on Earth, following Apollo 8’s splashdown. (This was 1968, after all, way before digital downloads of images.) But radio and television signals could be transmitted the thousands of miles between Terra and Luna, and the duty personnel at NASA Houston could hear the excitement in the voices of Frank Borman, James Lovell and Bill Anders as they saw Earth ascend above the lunar terminator (the horizon edge of the Moon as they orbited it, a constantly moving value). They instinctively realized that someplace in here was a photograph and a half, and they “scrabbled” (as much as people could in the cramped confines of the Apollo command module) for a roll of color film to record the moment.

Later, during the second scheduled television transmission to Earth, the crew read a “message” for the people of Earth ….

=====

1 Poole, Robert. Earthrise:  How Man First Saw the Earth. New Haven, 2008: Yale University Press. ISBN: 9780300137668. DDC: 525.0222. LC: QB637 .P66 2008. (Cited in Wilford, John Noble (July 13, 2009). “On Hand for Space History, as Superpowers Spar”. The New York Times. Retrieved December 21, 2018.)

=====

Posted December 21, 2018 by Harper Ganesvoort in History, Real Life

Tagged with ,

“… the eleventh hour of the eleventh day ….”   3 comments

A recreation of The Cenotaph, the monument built originally to honor the British and Empire dead of World War I, here in London City.  (Some items on the wall are derendered for the photo.)

This year, November 11 will be extra notable in many countries.  It will have been one hundred years since November 11, 1918, the day that saw an armistice go into effect at 11:00 a.m. between the warring countries, ending fighting in what we now call the First World War.  Most people of the time hoped it would truly be the last major war, the “war to end war,” as it was phrased.  Sadly, as R. F. Delderfield suggested in To Serve Them All My Days, they had merely blown half-time.  It took only twenty years, along with a punitive peace treaty, governments using its terms to exact vengeance on Germany, and the general world economic collapse of the Great Depression (combined with the massive financial mistakes of the German government during and after the war), to open the path for the instigators of the next great war ….

Read the rest of this entry »

Neighbors

This statue honoring Fred Rogers is more formally titled “Tribute to Children.”  Rogers would have preferred it that way ….  It stands on the North Shore area of Pittsburgh, near where the Allegheny River joins the Monongahela to form the Ohio River.

Google has a new Doodle today, one that I take personal pleasure in for one or two reasons.  I used to live in Pennsylvania, several counties north of Pittsburgh; and, when I lived in Florida, I attended Rollins College.  How connected, you ask?

They’re connected via Fred McFeely Rogers, of course.  Google’s Doodle celebrates the 50th anniversary of the first taping of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood (back then it was actually “Misterogers”).

Read the rest of this entry »
%d bloggers like this: