Archive for the ‘Elections’ Tag

Vote … Canada   Leave a comment

An Elections Canada ballot box is shown on federal election day in Montreal, Monday, May 2, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

The ladies have ceded the blog to me for today, because their goals are much the same as mine when it comes to politics. Specifically, we want you to vote.

This time, though, I’m talking, and so I’m talking to Canadians. Today is our scheduled general election day, after 40 bruising days of campaigning by the six parties, and it’s now up to us to choose. That’s what I’m asking you to do. Polls are already closed in the Atlantic provinces and parts of my province of Québec, and more will be closing in some 20 minutes. It’s your job, if your poll is still open, to get in there and make your X on your ballot.

Why? Because, believe it or not, the votes matter. This is where we finally get a real say in how we want our country to work, how we can hold these men and women accountable for the actions they’ve taken. Your vote matters, especially in an election as close as this one is. So get out there!

Posted October 21, 2019 by Conan Bankersbox in Real Life

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Veterans Day and Election Day 2016

veterans-day

Jem, Conan (who couldn’t be present) and I all salute our country, our veteran relations and ancestors, and our democratic process.

In part, Veterans Day and Election Day are close enough together this year that I decided to combine the two together into one post. This isn’t normally my practice, but the theme I’m going to talk about here links into both, as it’s a matter that links the two days together.  As I’ve done before, I’m writing for all three of us, and adding their signatures to this article with my friends’ review and permission, for which I thank them most gratefully.

We at Around the Grid all have a father or grandfather who served in the U. S. armed forces at some point — as well, doubtless, as any number of ancestors we have never known — and we were raised “traditionally” enough to have a reasonably strong sense of patriotism, along with belief in our country and its inherent good and decency.  Our ancestors fought on behalf of the United States in any number of wars, going back to the Revolutionary War, because they believed in those facts.  They desired the right of a man — and now of a person — to be free, to determine their own destiny with the least imposition of rule by the government over them, and only by their own consent when the government did institute a law of some kind.  Jem and Conan haven’t mentioned any specifics about their fathers; but I can tell you that my own, as I think I’ve mentioned in the past, fought and bled for those ideals in France in World War II.  (This is the reason I wear the purple duster I have on above, for Dad’s Purple Heart; and the purple strip in Jemmy’s dress is suggestive.)  Many more since have fought, or simply served and stood ready to defend this country against its perceived enemies.  Again, as this blog tries to do every year, we salute those men and women — not always understood, never enough appreciated, often wounded in spirit as well as body, but willing to lay their lives down if called upon for the greater good.

Please don’t stop here; more words, even more important, are past the turn of the page.

Election Day in USA

Posted November 6, 2012 by Harper Ganesvoort in Real Life

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SL in Politics: USA 1, UK 0

johnny (sic) at Second Life Shrink writes of how, during the current election in Great Britain, none of the parties appear to have a presence in Second Life.  This contrasts sharply with the 2008 American presidential and congressional elections, when supporters both Democrat and Republican were out in force in several areas.  johnny asks if British parties are wary of doing a John Edwards tank of griefers (see his article for links), or if the profile of the Grid has slipped over the past year and a quarter.

I would suggest, myself, with no supporting evidence, that there might be a third reason.  Remember that parliamentary elections in most countries run only 30 to 60 days (beyond the usual party posturing in the Commons, of course [grin]).  Perhaps it isn’t worth the time and money to British parties to try and whip up the faithful in world yet.

Question:  how much difference, or perhaps relevance, did the party support in world (much more grass-roots, but to a logically smaller audience) make to the 2008 American elections?

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