Contact Sheet 35

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Contact Sheet is an irregular column of selected photographs and portraits from Residents of Second Life and other virtual worlds. All rights to featured images are reserved to the artists under appropriate copyright laws. Click on the links as necessary to go to the required blog, Flickr or Koinup page. Please go to these artists’ pages in any case to leave comments, (as well as comments here), if you have an account on the appropriate service.

Suggestions are appreciated; please send descriptions and links to me by in-world IM, notecard, E-mail to harper.ganesvoort@gmail.com, or leave a comment below.

NOTICE: Some of the photos/links may contain nudity. Viewer discretion advised.

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I got up to check the computer this morning after a power blink — which you should take seriously, by the way, when it happens to you; it was a power dropout that caused the surge that sent this computer into the shop last time, fried a bank of memory that refuses to be replaced, and took out my sound card as well.  Any road, I pulled up the photo services while I was there, and look what I found — a boatload of good photography!

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Harbor-Galaxy is an old hand in the world of Contact Sheet; here, she gives us a lovely interpretation of elevation or enlightenment in Awaiting Sainthood (heard it’s held up in committee).  The title is witty, but the art is far from that:

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While Carlotta Ceawlin brings us a dreamy, pastoral look at a side of Tempura Island that I, for one, have never seen, with Bloom.  You usually head straight over to the dance club when you teleport into Tempura, swimming against the lag for a long time (at least I do).  Carlotta has found a patch of ground that’s something else, then given it the ethereal feel that some of her best work has.

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I was thinking of saving this one for a Hallowe’en special, but it’s just too good, funny or something to save.  Welcome to newcomer to Contact Sheet “spyvsspyaeon,” and his take on Jack Skellington, but in a very different place — specifically, in the recreation of Dante’s Inferno by Rebecca Bashly.  (Actually, Jack looks right at home here….)

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Speaking of Rebecca’s work — which, for latecomers to this article down the months, is a temporary exhibit, so the SLurl above won’t necessarily take you where you want to go — here’s another look at it:  a far more visceral portrayal by newcomer “Carthalis.”  Based on the title, it’s somewhere in the 7th Circle, as I recall my Sayers translation of the Inferno1; but which bowge, I cannot say.  (Rebecca managed to fit the entirety of the Inferno into the exhibit by starting you out very high up in the air, some 1,500 or 2,000 meters with the Vestibule, and then, appropriately, working downward toward the core of Hell at the “center of the Earth.”

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Finally, something that looks like it belongs in the deepest part of the Pit — newcomer Tari Ember’s one of those days bw2.  View the picture; ’nuff said (shudder).

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1 If you ever want to tackle the Divine Comedy, the best English translation in my (limited) experience was done by Dorothy L. Sayers, who was a scholar in medieval languages as well as the creator of Lord Peter Wimsey.  No translation is ever the original, especially when dealing with great poets like Dante or Alexander Pushkin; so if you want to read Dante instead of Sayers translating Dante, go and learn Italian.  (Dante especially loathed translations, which may be, on speculation, one reason why he wrote the Commedia in the vulgate Italian instead of “scholarly” Latin, so many could read it instead of just those who had been to school and got themselves Latin.  That hasn’t stopped the translators — as Sayers herself admits in the introduction to the Penguin edition of her work.)  But Sayers creates an eminently readable translation here, managing to bring Dante’s terza rima form into English with little loss of the power of the poem.

Posted October 11, 2011 by Harper Ganesvoort in Photographs

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